I Sold My Eggs For $18,000 To Pay For College

From 2000 to 2010, egg donations for IVF saw a 70 percent spike from 10,801 to 18,306 annual donations. Preliminary data shows over 330,000 assisted reproductive technology and IVF procedures are performed in 2019. For many women, the ability to make money by donating eggs at the height of their fertility is a lifeline—Kia Lauren Brown, 27, is one of them. For years, she struggled to pay for her own college tuition. She bartended, worked at an airport and customer service jobs to save up money with big dreams of eventually going into a broadcast television and entertainment program.

Then at 21, she applied to be an egg donor and got the opportunity to help a single father conceive. Kia was thrilled when she learned she would be paid $8,000 as a first time egg donor. She began regimented exercise routines and hormone injections to produce more eggs for retrieval.

Six years later, she was ready to start her broadcast program, but had to find a way to pay for the $15,000 tuition. She decided to donate her eggs again—this time for $10,000.

Although the long-term health effects of egg donations have not been researched extensively, Kia has no regrets and proudly says being an egg donor not only helped her avoid student loans altogether, but also helped someone fulfill their lifelong dream of starting a family.

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I Donated My Eggs For $18,000 To Pay For College

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